George Gordon, Lord Byron (1788 - 1824).

Byron lived for some time in Venice and was a Greek patriot

So we'll go no more a-roving

So late into the night,

Though the heart be still as loving,

And the moon be still as bright.

For the sword outwears it's sheath,

And the soul wears out the breast,

And the heart must pause to breathe,

And Love itself have rest.

Though the night was made for loving,

And the day returns too soon,

Yet we'll go no more a-roving

By the light of the moon.

When we two parted

In silence and tears,

Half broken-hearted

To sever for years,


Pale grew thy cheek and cold,

Colder thy kiss;

Truly that hour foretold

sorrow to this.


The dew of the morning

Sunk chill on my brow -

It felt like a warning

Of what I feel now.


Thy vows are all broken,

And light is thy fame:

I hear thy name spoken

And share in its shame.


They name thee before me,

A knell to mine ear;

A shudder comes o'er me -

Why wert thou so dear?


They know not I knew thee,

Who knew thee too well:

Long, long shall I rue thee,

Too deeply to tell.


In secret we met -

In silence I grieve,

That thy heart should forget,

Thy spirit deceive.


If I should meet thee

After long years,

How should I greet thee?

With silence and tears

Remember.  Christina Rossetti (1830-1894)

Piano. David Herbert Lawrence (1885 -1930)

Remember me when I am gone away,

Gone far away into the silent land;

When you can no more hold me by the hand,

Nor I half turn to go yet turning stay.


Remember me when no more day by day

You tell me of our future that you plann'd:

Only remember me; you understand

It will be late to counsel then or pray.


Yet if you should forget me for a while

And afterwards remember, do not grieve:

For if the darkness and corruption leave

A vestige of the thoughts that once I had,


Better by far you should forget and smile

Than that you should remember and be sad.

Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me;

Taking me back down the vista of years, till I see

A child sitting under the piano, in the boom of the tingling strings

And pressing the small, poised feet of a mother who smiles as she sings.


In spite of myself, the insidious mastery of song

Betrays me back, till the heart of me weeps to belong

To the old Sunday evenings at home, with winter outside

And hymns in the cosy parlour, the tinkling piano our guide.


So now it is vain for the singer to burst into clamour

With the great black piano appassionato. The glamour

Of childish days is upon me, my manhood is cast

Down in the flood of remembrance.

I weep like a child for the past.

Break, Break, Break

Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809 - 1892).

My Love is Like a Red Red Rose

Scottish famous Poet, Robert Burns (1759 - 96)

Break, break, break,

On thy cold grey stones, O Sea!

And I would that my tongue could utter

The thoughts that arise in me.


O well for the fisherman’s boy,

That he shouts with his sister at play!

O well for the sailor lad,

That he sings in his boat on the bay!


And the stately ships go on

To their haven under the hill;

But O for the touch of a vanish’d hand,

And the sound of a voice that is still!


Break, break, break

At the foot of thy crags, O Sea!

But the tender grace of a day that is dead

Will never come back to me.

O my Luve's like a red, red rose.

That's newly sprung in June;

O my Luve's like the melodie

That's sweetly play'd in tune.

As fair art thou, my bonnie lass,

So deep in luve am I;

And I will love the still, my Dear,

Till a' the seas gang dry.

Till a' the seas gang dry, my Dear,

And the rocks melt wi' the sun:

I will love thee still, my dear,

While the sands o' life shall run.

And fare thee weel, my only Luve!

And fare thee weel, a while!

And I will come again, my Luve,

Tho' it were ten thousand mile!


luve=love   fair art thou=you are beautiful bonnie=nice, sweet  lovely lass=girl  gang=become wi'=with   o'=of   fare thee weel=farewell to you

Thou'=even if (although)

Oft in the Stilly Night

Thomas Moore Irish Poet, 1779 - 1852

OFT, in the stilly night,
Ere slumber's chain has bound me,
Fond Memory brings the light
Of other days around me:
The smiles, the tears

Of boyhood's years,
The words of love then spoken;
The eyes that shone,
Now dimm'd and gone,
The cheerful hearts now broken!


Thus, in the stilly night,
Ere slumber's chain has bound me,
Sad Memory brings the light
Of other days around me.

When I remember all
The friends, so link'd together,
I've seen around me fall
Like leaves in wintry weather,
I feel like one
Who treads alone
Some banquet-hall deserted,
Whose lights are fled,
Whose garlands dead,
And all but he departed!


Thus, in the stilly night,
Ere slumber's chain has bound me.
Sad Memory brings the light
Of other days around me.

Thomas Moore

 Oft, in the stilly night,

Ere Slumber's chain hath bound me,

Fond Memory brings the light

Of other days around me;

The smiles, the tears,

Of boyhood's years,

The words of love then spoken;

The eyes that shone,

Now dimm'd and gone,

The cheerful hearts now broken!


Thus, in the stilly night,

Ere Slumber's chain hath bound me,

Sad Memory brings the light

Of other days around me.


When I remember all

The friends, so link'd together,

I've seen around me fall

Like leaves in wintry weather;

I feel like one,

Who treads alone

Some banquet-hall deserted,

Whose lights are fled,

Whose garlands dead,

And all but he departed!


Thus, in the stilly night,

Ere Slumber's chain hath bound me,

Sad Memory brings the light

Of other days around me.







Oft - often

Stilly = still

Ere = before

Slumber = sleep

hath = has








garlands = chains of flowers


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